Alfa Romeo 4C Coupé Road Test | Latest News

Alfa Romeo 4C Coupé Road Test | Latest News

There’s a hiss behind my left shoulder and the chirrup of a blow-off valve behind my right. This cacophony is overlaid with the blare of a highly-tuned 4-cylinder engine and some pops and bangs from a very short, very loud exhaust – all of this indicating that the little monster I’m piloting is primed and ready to attack the upcoming corner. And this is exactly the point where the universe decided to pull a prank on me by spilling something oily on the normally grippy surface. This is not an ideal situation in any car, let alone a little mid-engined Italian exotic. I’m barreling into a corner rather quickly, and as the car loses its grip on the road, the next day’s clickbait-worthy news headline flashes in my imagination: “Motoring Journalist Wrecks Italian Sports Car”. And indeed, the little Alfa steps smartly sideways, but I manage to arrest the slide and straighten out the car’s trajectory thanks to my lightning-quick reflexes and superb car-control skill. Actually, that’s not at all what happened. Rather, the car’s inherent balance and quick-reacting steering made it absurdly easy to control, turning a near-disastrous slide into a graceful drift worthy of a Japanese cult movie – and making me look like an amazing driver in the process (a blatant untruth, but I’ll take what I can get)… That’s the thing about the Alfa Romeo 4C: it flatters you as much as it insults you, and delivers sensory delight and physical abuse in equal measure. If you desire passion, both love and conflict, in your relationship with a car, this is exactly what you need...
Hyundai’s new Veloster Turbo is gaining velocity. | New Car Review

Hyundai’s new Veloster Turbo is gaining velocity. | New Car Review

I can remember the first time I saw the Hyundai Veloster, I wasn’t a motor journalist at the time, but I recall how eye-striking the car was – futuristic and aggressive looking and I could not help think, “wow, this car must be really fast.” That’s until I spoke to the owner, who in a mild manner, said, “it’s all show and no go!” You see the Veloster is a marvellously designed vehicle, but with a normally-aspirated 1.6L four-cylinder engine only – it was just plain boring. Four years on; is the new Veloster Turbo any better? Absolutely. Its Kammback coupe design has received a refresh. The inverted trapezoidal dual exhaust outlet, is now replaced with a bazooka looking double-barrel/triple-layered chromed exhaust tip, 18” alloy rims/low-profile tyres replace the 17” wheels, along with bigger brakes,...
Just something the South African car market needs – more SWAG! | New Car Review

Just something the South African car market needs – more SWAG! | New Car Review

Chery began producing vehicles in 1999, with their first export leaving the factory in Wuhu China in 2001; they have continued to spread the Chery love worldwide and in a developing country like South Africa, the sales are going to cook – especially now with their latest protégé, the J2 SWAG – which sounds more like a R&B rapper’s A.K.A. In a nutshell it is a J2, but with more SWAG. So quickly let’s define the urban-term swag. It means, Something We Asians Got – no not quite! It implies a person or object who has style and is cool. The J2 SWAG is what it is, a well spec’d entry level small hatchback, donned with a set of sporty 17” rims, low profile tyres, a F1-X shiny bit on the exhaust tip, but without the sports exhaust – damn! Clothed in a stylish and sporty exterior, with similar design cues here-and-there to that of a Kia Rio or a Ford Figo – which I think is what helps it to ‘blend in.’ Now before you go-on about what you could buy for R154 900, like a Toyota……., Tata,………. Or something on the second hand market – shame on you! The J2 Swag comes standard with Sat-Nav, Bluetooth, USB/AUX/SD functions, a front-loader CD player – because not every millennial car buyer uses their iPhone to listen to music – and a six-speaker ‘not bad’ audio system. The touch screen is a bit faint and glary under ambient light conditions – so night time is the dead giveaway of how easy it is to operate the infotainment system. Still, the...
KIA Cerato Koup | New Car Review

KIA Cerato Koup | New Car Review

The new Kia KOUP is an agreeable car, easy to live with and easy to drive. On the open road and along flat asphalt, the KOUP stretches its 1.6L Turbocharged engine unleashes a fervent 152kw, nothing to smirk at, considering its exquisite aero-profile, the interior comfort/space, extended leg-room and the cars overall practical functionality. With the KOUP now under R300 000, its bound to be one of the best value for money buys this...
Mercedes Benz GLA 250 VS Hyundai IX 35 | New Car Review

Mercedes Benz GLA 250 VS Hyundai IX 35 | New Car Review

The Mercedes Benz GLA 250 4Matic does have some outdoors, off-road prowess, but should you drive it on the beaten track? So we briefly put it through its paces at the The Wedge Outdoor Adventure Trail – for good measure we also tested the Hyundai Ix35d SUV. One has more styling, the other more versatility. Which one do you think is better at...
When life gives you a cactus, you don’t make Tequila – you drive it. | New Car Review

When life gives you a cactus, you don’t make Tequila – you drive it. | New Car Review

The new 2015 Citroen C4 Cactus, (nicknamed C.C.C) made its debut right in the sweltering heat of the Renault Captur and Ford EcoSport release – but the Cactus is a slight of more beastly elegance. Its stealthy aerodynamics is a Kodak moment, captivated by the tortoise shell looking thermoplastic polyurethane Airbumps skirted on the driver and passenger doors, a design distinction sure to become lionized amongst our road going public. The Airbumps protect the pearlescent white paintwork from irritating little dents and paint chips left by door slinging anarchists. This is the same quality polyurethane material inserted on the inside door panels and inlay of the centre console. The cabin architecture is eccentric with a classic use of vintage material on the ultra-comfortable seats, a modified floating dashboard, (airbags are located in the roofline behind the sun visor), and black piano accents on the air vents – with the climate control dials nowhere to be found. Well, that is until you open the in car infotainment system on the 7” touch screen, and this is where you will find all the Sat-Nav, climate control, Bluetooth and USB/AUX functions. Not having immediate access to any climate control buttons or dials is an oversight, like the omitted auto up/down function on the electric windows and (instead of electric windows) – pop-out windows in the rear. Undeniably comfortable and spacious – the rear seat is literally a sofa-style single bench. Sure to become a trademark of the Cactus is the flat bottom and flat top steering wheel. Behind that, is a funky digital flat screen speedometer with a piece of the puzzle...